Elections

PASSED AND SIGNED INTO LAW

None.

 

DID NOT PASS

Cybersecurity – SF 3839

As part of the $1.3 trillion federal spending bill approved in March 2018, Congress appropriated $380 million in grants to help state administer federal elections and make cybersecurity and technology improvements. Minnesota received $6.6 million in federal funds to be used over the next five years. Secretary of State Steve Simon requested legislative approval of $1.5 million to make Minnesota’s statewide voter registration system more secure and protect against cyberattacks during the 2018 midterm elections. Republicans only included this request in the vetoed supplemental budget bill, putting Minnesota’s election system at risk from foreign interference. Russian hackers scanned Minnesota’s voter system in 2016, but did not breach it.

Prohibition on Ranked Choice Voting – SF 3325

Republican lawmakers tried to prohibit cities, counties, towns, and school districts from implementing ranked-choice voting (RCV), which allows voters to rank multiple candidates instead of voting for a single individual. If no candidate reaches 50% support, votes for the least popular candidate are redistributed to others until the 50% threshold is met. Minneapolis and St. Paul currently use RCV for citywide elections. This billed stalled in the rules committee.

Omnibus elections bill – SF 3021

The omnibus elections bill included largely technical and clarifying changes to election law agreed upon by the Secretary of State, League of Women Voters – Minnesota, and Association of Minnesota Counties. The bill was never taken up by the full Senate.

 

VETOED

None.

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